How Much Are Russian Compounds In Maryland, New York Worth?

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The Squander Staff
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This evening The Washington Post reported that Donald Trump and his administration are planning to return two Russian compounds -- one in Maryland, and one in New York -- to the Russian government.

How much are Russian compounds in New York and Maryland worth?

How Much is the Russian Compound in Maryland Worth?

According to The Washington Post, the Russian compound in Maryland is a 45 acre plot bought in the 1970s. It's the former estate of an executive of GM and DuPont.

Here's what the Post says about it:

After the turmoil of the collapse of the Soviet Union, Pioneer Point was bought by the Russian Federation -- at the time, the Associated Press reported its value was $3 million. Local residents told the AP that they didn't have any problems with the Russians who visited the compound.

Now, the property is worth $8 million, according to CBS in Maryland.

How Much is the Russian Compound in New York Worth?

The Russian compound in New York is in Upper Brookville, NY. It's 14 acres of secluded property, and the Russians used to have giant parties there.

At some point, according to NBC, it was used as a summer camp for Russians. It was chosen to have good microwave characteristics. There's suspicion that signals intelligence was being tracked from this property, to spy on U.S. communications.

According to NBC, it has been under constant surveillance:

A senior U.S. intelligence official told NBC News that the New York and Maryland facilities are under constant U.S. surveillance. They are not believed to have played any role in the election hack, said the official, and in 2016 have no intelligence gathering capabilities that the Russians don't have at other facilities.

Jeffrey Richelson, the intelligence historian, agreed that the facilities were legacies of the Cold War, but wasn't so sure they were artifacts. "Whether they're artifacts," he said, "depends on the current use."

The Russian compound in New York is reportedly worth $10 million.